Inequality

The cluster on inequality brings together work in a variety of fields -- on health, education, incomes, housing, families, organizations and meaning making in the United States and beyond. Joined by an interest in the stratifying effects of institutions, culture, political power and history, the Harvard research program exerts a large influence on the sociological analysis of social and economic inequality. In many cases Harvard faculty have set the terms of debates on race and class inequality, and trends in poverty and inequality in the United States over the last half century. Through its connections to the Inequality and Social Policy program, and the Kennedy School, faculty have also been vitally involved in expanding opportunity and improving welfare for the most disadvantaged in American society.

News related to Inequality

Michele Lamont stands in front of a lecturn

Lamont Presidential Lecture out in American Sociological Review

June 10, 2018

Michèle Lamont, Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies, Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies, served as the 108th president of the American Sociological Association in 2016-17. Her term took an unexpected turn with the election of Donald Trump in November 2016: it befell on her to take a leadership role in defending the professional interests of sociologists and the conditions for academic freedom.... Read more about Lamont Presidential Lecture out in American Sociological Review

Professor Mary Brinton

Gender Inequality, Employment, and Family in Postindustrial Societies

May 1, 2018

Mary Brinton has been studying gender inequality for a long time, motivated in particular by the high level of gender inequality in Japan and other East Asian societies. Her current project considers gender inequality in light of what many social demographers consider a crisis of the family as an institution—namely, the emergence of historically low birth rates throughout the postindustrial world.... Read more about Gender Inequality, Employment, and Family in Postindustrial Societies

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