Political and Historical Sociology

2017 Nov 15

Global Populism: Euroskepticism in a Post-Brexit Era, panel discussion

2:15pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies 27 Kirkland Street, Lower Conference Room

Weatherhead Research Cluster on Global Populisim -Euroskepticism in a Post-Brexit Era

 

Panelists:

Catherine de Vries, Professor of Politics, Department of Government, University of Essex, UK 
Matthew Goodwin, Professor of Politics and International Relations, University of Kent, UK
Kathleen McNamara, Professor of Government and Foreign Service and Director of the Mortara Center for International Studies, Georgetown University ...

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2017 Oct 19

Global Populism panel discussion: The Economic and Cultural Causes of Populist Support

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Room 105

Weatherhead Research Cluster on Global Populisim The Economic and Cultural Causes of Populist Support Panelists:
David Autor, Ford Professor of Economics, MIT
Luigi Guiso, AXA Professor of Household Finance and Insurance, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance, Italy; Fellow, Centre for Economic Policy Research, United Kingdom
Peter A. Hall, Krupp Foundation Professor of European Studies, Department of Government, Harvard University

Discussants:
...

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Headshot of Bart Bonikowski, Assistant Professor of Sociology.

The Mobilization of Resentment: Making Sense of Populism, Nationalism, and Authoritarianism in the United States and Europe

September 7, 2017

Scholarly and journalistic accounts of the recent successes of radical-right candidates and parties in Europe and the United States tend to conflate three phenomena: populism, nationalism, and authoritarianism. While all three are relevant features of contemporary politics, they are neither coterminous nor limited to the political right. This lack of analytical clarity has hindered explanations of the causes and consequences of radicalism on both sides of the Atlantic. In a new project that builds on his past empirical research, Bart Bonikowski draws analytical distinctions between populism, nationalism, and authoritarianism, theorizes their elective affinities, and examines their shifting prevalence over the past three decades, both in political discourse and public attitudes.... Read more about The Mobilization of Resentment: Making Sense of Populism, Nationalism, and Authoritarianism in the United States and Europe

Viterna Team

Examining the Unintended Consequences of Social Mobilization

August 9, 2017

We tend to think of social movements as promoters of social change, but might they also be key agents in maintaining—and even reinforcing—the status quo? Harvard professor Jocelyn Viterna, with graduate student Bo Yun Park and undergraduate students Quinn Sluzenski, Enya Huang, and Bryant Park, are examining hundreds of press releases from 10 oppositional “pairs” of U.S. social movements (e.g., gun rights vs gun control, anti-abortion rights vs pro-abortion rights, etc) to examine this question. Building from existing social movement theory, our team hypothesizes that all social movements incorporate culturally resonant “tethers” into their calls for social change. ... Read more about Examining the Unintended Consequences of Social Mobilization

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