Inequality

Samson, Frank L., and Lawrence D. Bobo. 2014. “Ethno-Racial Attitudes and Social Inequality”. in The Handbook of the Social Psychology of Inequality, edited by Jane D. McLeod, Edward J. Lawler, and Michael Schwalbe. New York, NY: Springer.
Explaining Low Fertility in Postindustrial Societies

Explaining Low Fertility in Postindustrial Societies

August 16, 2014

Why are so many young people in certain regions of the postindustrial world delaying marriage and children, or not moving forward at all on either front?  Southern European and East Asian countries now universally have birth rates that are far below what is required to naturally replace their populations. This is leading to rapid population aging and the specter of lowered economic productivity. To unravel the reasons behind historically unprecedented low birth rates, Mary Brinton (Reischauer Institute Professor of Sociology) is leading a team of international collaborators in a five-country comparative study of gender equality and fertility.... Read more about Explaining Low Fertility in Postindustrial Societies

The RISK Study: Long Term Resilience and Recovery from Disasters

The RISK Study: Long Term Resilience and Recovery from Disasters

June 2, 2014

Mary C. Waters (M.E. Zukerman Professor of Sociology) and Jean Rhodes, (Frank L. Boyden Professor of Psychology at University of Massachusetts, Boston) have been awarded a three year Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy Research for The RISK study—Resilience in Survivors of Hurricane Katrina. This is a longitudinal study of 1,019 largely female African American poor people in New Orleans. They were part of a study of community college students that began a year before Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005. So the study includes two waves of pre-disaster data on physical and mental health, social support, social trust, socioeconomic status and many other indicators.... Read more about The RISK Study: Long Term Resilience and Recovery from Disasters

Faculty Spotlight: Balancing Work and Family in Contemporary American Families

Faculty Spotlight: Balancing Work and Family in Contemporary American Families

May 8, 2014

How do decisions to partner and parent affect the work lives of American men and women? A long line of research in the social sciences suggests that men reap wage benefits from marriage and fatherhood, while women experience wage losses when they become mothers. One explanation for this gender disparity has been that different-sex partners divide labor, with men taking primary responsibility for paid labor and wives for unpaid labor.

This historic explanation may not fit the experiences of contemporary American couples, many of whom are dual-career. In a recent...

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