Health and Population

Salvadoran Mothers Incarcerated for Stillbirths

Salvadoran Mothers Incarcerated for Stillbirths

September 14, 2015

Between 1989 and 2009, six Latin American nations passed total abortion bans.  Women in these countries are now denied abortions under every circumstance, even when a pregnancy may put their lives at risk.  In El Salvador, the passage of a total abortion ban was additionally followed by a steep rise in the incarceration of women for the “aggravated homicide” of their “newborns,” often with 30-40 year prison sentences.  Pro-life proponents argue vociferously that these extreme incarcerations are appropriate punishments for women who birthed healthy, full term babies and then killed them to avoid their motherly duties.  Pro-choice proponents, in contrast, argue that these incarcerated women committed no crime, but rather suffered from poverty, limited medical support, and obstetrical emergencies.... Read more about Salvadoran Mothers Incarcerated for Stillbirths

Death by Design: A Global Approach to Social Inequalities in Health

Death by Design: A Global Approach to Social Inequalities in Health

April 10, 2015

Why do some people live long lives, while others die prematurely? What does the accident of birth in one place rather than another tell us about how human-designed social institutions write the rules of life and death? Why are race, class, and gender stronger social determinants of health in some places and times, and weaker in other times and places? With seed-grant support from the Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public health, Jason Beckfield has launched a new project that uses comparative sociology to answer these questions.... Read more about Death by Design: A Global Approach to Social Inequalities in Health

2015 Apr 24

Adia Benton: Epidemic projections and the politics of reckoning during the Ebola crisis

10:00am to 11:50am

Location: 

William James Hall 1550

Adia Benton, Ph.D., Assistant professor, Brown University will present in the Friday Morning Seminar organized by:

Mary-Jo Del Vecchio Good -- Byron J. Good

Erica James -- Seth Donal Hannah

Sponsored by:

Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Program in Medical Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University...

Read more about Adia Benton: Epidemic projections and the politics of reckoning during the Ebola crisis
2015 Apr 03

Juliet McMullin: Graphic Medicine: New Perspectives on Narrative, Illness and Clinical Encounters

10:00am to 11:50am

Location: 

William James Hall 1550

Juliet McMullin, Ph.D. Associate Professor, University of California Irvine will present in the Friday Morning Seminar organized by:

Mary-Jo Del Vecchio Good -- Byron J. Good

Erica James -- Seth Donal Hannah

Sponsored by:

Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Program in Medical Anthropology, Department of Anthropology,...

Read more about Juliet McMullin: Graphic Medicine: New Perspectives on Narrative, Illness and Clinical Encounters
2015 Mar 27

Alison Witchard: Operating the Social Body: Cancer 'Previvorship' in Australia and the United States

10:00am to 11:50am

Location: 

William James Hall 1550

Alison Witchard, Ph.D., candidate, Anthropology, Australian National University, and a 2014-2015 Fulbright Scholar and a Visiting Fellow at the Anthropology Department, Harvard University will present in the Friday Morning Seminar organized by:

Mary-Jo Del Vecchio Good -- Byron J. Good

Erica James -- Seth Donal Hannah

Sponsored by:

Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical...

Read more about Alison Witchard: Operating the Social Body: Cancer 'Previvorship' in Australia and the United States
2015 Feb 20

Helen Marrow: Excluded and Frozen Out: Unauthorized Immigrants’ (Non) Access to Care after Healthcare Reform

10:00am to 11:50am

Location: 

MIT - Building 3, Room #333 (Maclaurin Building)

 

Helen Marrow, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology at Tufts University presents at the Friday Morning Seminar organized by:

Mary-Jo Del Vecchio Good -- Byron J. Good

Erica James -- Seth Donal Hannah

Sponsored by:

Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Program in Medical Anthropology, Department of...

Read more about Helen Marrow: Excluded and Frozen Out: Unauthorized Immigrants’ (Non) Access to Care after Healthcare Reform
Explaining Low Fertility in Postindustrial Societies

Explaining Low Fertility in Postindustrial Societies

August 16, 2014

Why are so many young people in certain regions of the postindustrial world delaying marriage and children, or not moving forward at all on either front?  Southern European and East Asian countries now universally have birth rates that are far below what is required to naturally replace their populations. This is leading to rapid population aging and the specter of lowered economic productivity. To unravel the reasons behind historically unprecedented low birth rates, Mary Brinton (Reischauer Institute Professor of Sociology) is leading a team of international collaborators in a five-country comparative study of gender equality and fertility.... Read more about Explaining Low Fertility in Postindustrial Societies

The RISK Study: Long Term Resilience and Recovery from Disasters

The RISK Study: Long Term Resilience and Recovery from Disasters

June 2, 2014

Mary C. Waters (M.E. Zukerman Professor of Sociology) and Jean Rhodes, (Frank L. Boyden Professor of Psychology at University of Massachusetts, Boston) have been awarded a three year Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy Research for The RISK study—Resilience in Survivors of Hurricane Katrina. This is a longitudinal study of 1,019 largely female African American poor people in New Orleans. They were part of a study of community college students that began a year before Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005. So the study includes two waves of pre-disaster data on physical and mental health, social support, social trust, socioeconomic status and many other indicators.... Read more about The RISK Study: Long Term Resilience and Recovery from Disasters

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