Colloquium Series

2017 Feb 28

Sociology Department Colloquium Series presentation by Sean F. Reardon: Segregation and Educational Opportunity: New Evidence from Population Data

3:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall 1550

Sociology Department Colloquium Series presentation by Sean F. Reardon, Stanford University. 

 

Segregation and Educational Opportunity: New Evidence from Population Data

Abstract:

 

Do patterns of racial and economic neighborhood and school segregation exacerbate racial and socioeconomic disparities in educational opportunities? I investigate this question using data from over 200 million standardized tests taken by students in every public school in the U.S., as well as Census… Read more about Sociology Department Colloquium Series presentation by Sean F. Reardon: Segregation and Educational Opportunity: New Evidence from Population Data

2017 Feb 07

Sociology Department Colloquium Series presentation by Jeremy Freese: The Problem of Causal Mutualisms, The Promise of Polygenic Scores, and The Pervasive Divergence of Life Outcomes

3:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall 1550

Sociology Department Colloquium Series presentation by Jeremy Freese, Stanford University.

 

The Problem of Causal Mutualisms, The Promise of Polygenic Scores, and The Pervasive Divergence of Life Outcomes

 

Abstract:

Casual mutualisms are sets of properties that have substantial reciprocal influence on one another.  This may sound abstruse, but various big constructs in behavioral science, including "heritability," "SES", "health", and "achievement," exhibit clear signs of… Read more about Sociology Department Colloquium Series presentation by Jeremy Freese: The Problem of Causal Mutualisms, The Promise of Polygenic Scores, and The Pervasive Divergence of Life Outcomes

2016 Mar 22

Nikki Jones: How Things Fall Apart: Race, gender and suspicion in police-civilian encounters

3:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall 1550

Department of Sociology Colloquium Series presentation by Nikki Jones, associate professor in the Department of African American Studies at UC-Berkeley.

Abstract:

How Things Fall Apart: Race, gender and suspicion in police-civilian encounters

 

Over the last year, the #BlackLivesMatter and #SayHerName campaigns have turned the nation’s attention to the too-often troubled relationship between Black communities and the police. The video recordings of encounters that begin over… Read more about Nikki Jones: How Things Fall Apart: Race, gender and suspicion in police-civilian encounters

2015 Feb 24

Chenoa A. Flippen: Immigrant Context and Opportunity: New Destinations and Socioeconomic Attainment among Asians in the United States

3:00pm to 5:00pm

The Department of Sociology Colloquium Series presents Chenoa A. Flippen, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Population Studies Center, University of Pennsylvania.

Professor Flippen received her B.A. in Psychology and Sociology from the University of Virginia and her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Chicago.… Read more about Chenoa A. Flippen: Immigrant Context and Opportunity: New Destinations and Socioeconomic Attainment among Asians in the United States

2014 Sep 30

Aliya Saperstein: The Dynamics of Race and Inequality in the United States

3:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall 1550

The Sociology Department is pleased to announce the first Colloquium speaker of this semester Professor Aliya Saperstein, Assistant Professor at Stanford University, will be giving a talk entitled, The Dynamics of Race and Inequality in the United States.

2014 Mar 11

Michael Jones-Correa - Leaning In or Hunkering Down? Contact, Trust and Civic Engagement among Immigrants and the Native Born

3:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

WJH 1550

A Sociology Colloquium presentation, co-sponsored with the Migration and Immigrant Incorporation Workshop, by Michael Jones-Correa, Department of Government, Cornell University.

There is a lively ongoing debate on whether contact among disparate individuals leads to a collective "hunkering down," or whether contact reinforces trust across the lines of ethnicity and race. Drawing on an a study of interactions among… Read more about Michael Jones-Correa - Leaning In or Hunkering Down? Contact, Trust and Civic Engagement among Immigrants and the Native Born

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