Crime and Punishment

Police Violence and Citizen Crime Reporting in the Black Community

October 11, 2016

In a new study, published in the current issue of the American Sociological Review, I investigate how publicized cases of police violence against unarmed black men — most prominently the 2004 beating of Frank Jude by white police officers in Milwaukee, Wisconsin — affected 911 calls in Milwaukee. Coauthored with fellow sociologists Andrew Papachristos (of Yale) and David S.

Asad selected as Radcliffe Fellow

Asad selected as Radcliffe Fellow

May 13, 2016

Doctoral candidate Asad L. Asad was one of three graduate students selected to be a Radcliffe Institute Graduate Student Fellow for 2016-17.  During his fellowship Asad will be completing his dissertation on "Living in the Shadows? Reconsidering How Immigrants Experience Enforcement Policy".

2016 Mar 22

Nikki Jones: How Things Fall Apart: Race, gender and suspicion in police-civilian encounters

3:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall 1550

Department of Sociology Colloquium Series presentation by Nikki Jones, associate professor in the Department of African American Studies at UC-Berkeley.

Abstract:

How Things Fall Apart: Race, gender and suspicion in police-civilian encounters

 

2016 Feb 18

Alex Ciomek, David Hureau, Roland Neil: Research Presentations on Crime

4:30pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall 450

Urban Social Processes Workshop presentations: 

"Allies and Accomplices: A Social Network Analysis of Boston Gangs"
Alex Ciomek, PhD Student, Harvard Sociology

"An Ethnographic Portrait of Concentrated Homicide in a Social Network"
David Hureau, PhD Student, Harvard Sociology & Social Policy

"Thinking Longitudinally About Neighborhoods and Crime"
Roland Neil, PhD Student, Harvard Sociology

Race, Self-Selection, and the Job Search Process

Race, Self-Selection, and the Job Search Process

January 20, 2016

Discrimination in hiring continues to limit the opportunities available to racial minorities. How do job seekers respond to this reality? Some argue that job seekers tailor their searches in ways that allow them to avoid discrimination. Others suggest that job seekers adapt by casting a wider net in their search. Until now, we have known little about this process, largely because no existing data source has closely followed individuals through their job search.

Mixed Methods Workshop (SOC 319) - (Expected to be offered in 2017-2018)

The graduate workshop on mixed methods is a forum for graduate students and faculty to present their empirical work—qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods—and get feedback on the empirical veracity of their claims. Individuals of all methodological persuasions are welcome. We are particularly interested in exploring synergies that can occur across methodological boundaries, either in the context of mixed-methods projects or in the context of collaboration between qualitative and quantitative researchers. (Expected to be offered in 2017-2018)

Read moreMixed Methods Workshop (SOC 319) - (Expected to be offered in 2017-2018)

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